The Difference Difference Can Make

frosty-beer

As you can tell, I believe that understanding and communicating your BIG Diff is one of the most important things an organization can do.

In my last post, I talked about how Toyota is able to align with a greater purpose – something that’s only distantly related to cars – to differentiate itself.  This is a real feat considering that many people would consider cars in Toyota’s competitive set (e.g. Honda, Kia, Hyundai, etc.) as overall being “generic” or “commoditized”, i.e. there’s little to tell them apart (that wouldn’t apply to Toyota’s Lexus brand though).

So here’s an example from another “commoditized” category – beer – that should act as a warning of what NOT to do.  This TV ad is filled with generic scenes (golf, the beach, a patio) and talks about generic things that really mean nothing (“you’re a complicated diverse creature”).  You could substitute Michelob beer with a host of other low-calorie beers and you wouldn’t need to change a thing about the ad, in either look or content.  The only reason I noticed it at all was  because my business background gives me a different POV on ads.  At least Coors Light creates a somewhat differentiated personality for itself.

So how do you avoid becoming generic? Once again, it comes down to defining your BIG Diff first.  It could be found in the product itself (as Lululemon or Canada Goose do), the personality (as Coors does), in a higher purpose (as Toyota does), or the experience (as Porter Airlines does), but you need that defining idea first before anything else. Once that’s done, you then have a clear understanding of what makes your product/service different from the competition, and you can execute your marketing to focus on those things to build your business.

That’s the difference your difference can make.